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Queens Anniversary Prizes 2015

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Uli

Ulrich Kleih

Marketing Economist / Principal Scientist
MSc Economics
Food and Markets Department
Natural Resources Institute

Biography

Ulrich Kleih has 26 years of experience in agricultural development and economics. This includes research, consultancy, and teaching work. He has held positions in an international organisation (UN Food and Agriculture Organization based in a project in Chad, 1987 - 1992), and, since 1992, in various capacities at the Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich. This includes group management between 1998 and 2001.
Ulrich has experience in supporting private sector development interventions at all stages of the project cycle. For example, in 2007/2008, he was on a team as Team Leader / Marketing Expert that prepared a marketing and branding strategy for Vietnamese shrimp. The project was funded by Danida and implemented at the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD). In 2011/2012, he conducted an analysis of options to source locally available raw materials for SABMiller owned breweries in Tanzania and Uganda. In particular, the study focussed on success factors of a sustainable barley sourcing programme analysing socio-economic conditions, business case, as well as institutional arrangements (e.g. success rate of outgrower schemes). In addition, local procurement of sorghum was investigated.

He has extensive experience in value chain and sub-sector analyses. Recent assignments include the preparation of value chain analyses and market studies for the cassava sectors in Ghana, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, and Malawi as part of the C:AVA (Cassava: Adding Value for Africa) project, which is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). Also, yam value chain studies have been carried out in Ghana and Nigeria for the Yam Improvement of Income and Food Security in West Africa (YIIFSWA) project, which is being coordinated by IITA and funded by BMGF. This led to local level activities related to business forum creation, capacity building in communities with farmers and traders, focussing on collective marketing, business plans and communication through media such as FM radio.

Between 2009 and 2012, Ulrich has been working on Theme A of the DFID sponsored programme "Agrifood Standards – Ensuring Compliance Increases Trade for Developing Countries" (ASEC). Theme A dealt with public standards, and how to support developing countries to cope better with the impacts of public sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures on access to international trade. This involved case studies in Kenya (fruitfly/avocado, and food safety/fish exports related), and South Africa (Citrus black spot related) assessing economic, social, institutional and environmental impacts of SPS measures. A toolbox has been developed incorporating 'tools' such as Causal Chain Analysis, Value Chain Analysis, Institutional Analysis and Cost-Benefit Analysis, in order to strengthen SPS coordination, assess the impact of SPS notifications and analyse the costs and benefits of control measures.

In 2010, a study has been carried out in Tanzania focusing on SPS coordination mechanisms, which resulted in a project proposal which was accepted for funding as part of a basked funding mechanism supporting the Ministry of Industry and Trade. The study was sponsored by the Geneva based Standards and Trade Development Facility (STDF). This was followed by a STDF sponsored study entitled "National SPS Coordination Mechanisms: An African Perspective", which was published in 2012.

He has led and participated in numerous trade related studies and projects, dealing with commodities such as fish, coffee, and horticultural products. This includes a Sustainability Impact Assessment of potential WTO/Doha Round outcomes on the fisheries sector in developing and industrialised countries. The study was funded by the European Commission/DG Trade and carried out in association with the University of Manchester.

He has been responsible for directing a number of research projects that deal with marketing issues (e.g. market information, rural transport solutions, community access to marketing opportunities, microfinance in fishing communities). Consultancies related to these topics have been carried out on similar issues for NGOs and other development organisations.

He has experience in monitoring and evaluation and was a member of a team that evaluated 20 years of Norwegian support to the fisheries sector, worldwide. In particular, he assessed Norwegian development assistance to the fisheries sector in Vietnam.

Other key expertise includes: Studies of the Rural Non-Farm Economy in Uganda and India, including policy advise; experience with integrating qualitative / participatory survey methods with quantitative/formal methods; teaching and training experience as part of MSc course teaching (e.g. Post-harvest economics), as well as consultancy workshops.

Key words:
Research and advisory work; Agricultural marketing analyses; International commodity trade including WTO issues (e.g. SPS); Agricultural market information systems involving various media such as rural radio, mobile phones, etc; Value chain analysis, Market research; Policy analysis; Agricultural innovation systems; Sub-sector analysis and Sustainable Livelihoods Approach; Rural non-farm employment; Microfinance; Intermediate means of transport; Participatory needs assessment approaches; Project design, implementation and evaluation; Food security programmes; Survey methodologies combining participatory/qualitative and quantitative techniques; Teaching and training.

Commodity focus: Roots and tubers, fish, horticulture, coffee, cereals, livestock.

Country experience: Ghana, Nigeria, Uganda, Tanzania, Vietnam, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Malawi, Yemen, Mali, Niger, Cambodia, Kenya, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Indonesia, Cote d'Ivoire, Haiti, Chad.

Research/Scholarly Interests

Marketing of produce plays an integral part of agricultural development. Fortunately, during the last decade the value chain approach has gained in importance with more emphasis on down-stream aspects of the chain. The main impacts one can achieve in this area are through local level capacity building of farmer and trader organisations and help facilitate the links between the two.

Current and Previous Funded Research Projects

Numerous contributions to research and consultancy projects (2008–2013), e.g., Cassava: Adding Value for Africa (Gates Foundation supported), Yam Improvement of Income and Food Security in West Africa (Gates Foundation supported), Local sourcing of barley in Tanzania and Uganda (SABMiller).

Between 2009 and 2012, work on Theme A of the DFID sponsored programme "Agrifood Standards – Ensuring Compliance Increases Trade for Developing Countries" (ASEC). Theme A dealt with public standards, and how to support developing countries to cope better with the impacts of public sanitary and phytosanitary (SPS) measures on access to international trade. This involved case studies in Kenya (fruitfly/avocado, and food safety/fish exports related), and South Africa (Citrus black spot related) assessing economic, social, institutional and environmental impacts of SPS measures. A toolbox has been developed incorporating 'tools' such as Causal Chain Analysis, Value Chain Analysis, Institutional Analysis and Cost-Benefit Analysis, in order to strengthen SPS coordination, assess the impact of SPS notifications and analyse the costs and benefits of control measures.

Study on Development of brand name strategies by producer groups for the Ministry of Fisheries in Vietnam (2007/2008). The study was supported by the DANIDA sponsored Fisheries Sector Programme Support Phase 2 (FSPS II) – Post-Harvest and Marketing component. Based on value chain analyses carried out for shrimp, tuna, and fermented seafood products, the study provided recommendations for a seafood branding and certification scheme involving a national quality mark, geographical indication, and certification related to eco-labelling.

Decentralised Market Information Service in Lira District, Uganda (2003/2004).

The project, which was funded by the DFID Crop Post-harvest Research Programme, placed a strong emphasis on a micro-level approach to market information systems and the use of local FM radio stations. Project partners included IITA / Foodnet, the Secretariat of the Plan for Modernisation of Agriculture (GoU – PMA), and local partners at District level. Following a baseline survey of farmers' livelihoods and their information sources and needs, a manual on collective marketing by farmer groups, and relevant radio programmes were being produced and tested in Lira, and adjacent districts. Monitoring and evaluation surveys were carried out and a final project workshop was organised.

'Improved food crop marketing through appropriate transport for poor farmers in Uganda' (2002–2004).

This involved stakeholder workshops, at which the responsibilities of project coalition partners were identified, and a baseline survey and action-research activities were planned. Following the baseline survey using participatory and quantitative techniques, action-research was carried out in Kasese, Iganga, and Katakwi Districts. The focus of the research was on Intermediate Means of Transport (IMTs) such as oxen, donkeys, carts, and bicycles, which were being being tested and validated in farming communities through participatory monitoring and evaluation. The project placed emphasis on partnership building and the institutional processes that need to be in place to strengthen the up-take of IMTs.

'Fish Distribution from Coastal Communities in Bangladesh – Market and Credit Access Issues', which was funded by the DFID Post-Harvest Fisheries Research Programme (2001-2002).

This involved the organisation of stakeholder workshops and research planning with collaborators, including Community Development Centre (CODEC) and the University of Chittagong. The project used a combination of livelihoods approach and marketing systems analysis to investigate constraints and opportunities in the marine fish marketing system in Bangladesh. Participatory and quantitative survey techniques were used for data collection.

Responsibilities within the University

  • Leader of projects and study teams

Selected Publications

Recent Conference Presentations

  • D Phillips1, U Kleih1, E Otoo4, P Boadu6, M Ogbonna2, H Etudaiye2, D Mignouna3, B Siwoku5 (October 2013), Yam Farming as a Business, Presentation at Global Yam Conference 2013, Accra, 3 – 6 October 2013.
  • Kleih, U (2011) Financial Services for SME Aquaculture and Fisheries Producers: Tanzania (Nile perch fishery) and Vietnam (pangasius and shrimp aquaculture) Case Studies. Presentation given at the International Conference: "It's Not Just About the Fish" Social and Cultural Perspectives of Sustainable Marine Fisheries; School of Science and the Greenwich Maritime Institute, University of Greenwich, UK; 4 & 5 April 2011.
  • Kleih, U., and Minghua Zhao (2008); World Fisheries Trade and Implications for Labour in Developing Countries; paper presented at the Fifth IMEHA International Congress of Maritime History, University of Greenwich, 23 – 27 June 2008.

External Recognition

  • Member of Development Study Association (DSA)
  • Member of The Chartered Institute of Marketing

Contact Information

Ulrich Kleih

Natural Resources Institute

University of Greenwich

Central Avenue, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, United Kingdom.

Tel: +44 (0)1634 883065

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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